Tighten up the Graphics

level 3 never looked so good

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It's difficult as a programmer to work with artists.  We develop things in completely different ways.  A programmer likes to build the software and then go live with it, when it's finished and bug-free.  Artists like to tinker with things, roughing out their work and then touching it up.  They don't mind checking something in half-finished or coming back to it later.  In fact, that's how they work best.

 

Developers and artists on a production team are strange bedfellows.  And what can you do, as the programmer?  You've got to give them something to play with!  This relationship adds a new level of complexity to the design and growth of the technology.  A new dimension.  Suddenly, I'm re-thinking designs to avoid changing the file format of a particular asset, lest we'd have to re-save everything.  Everything is production-quality, all the time.  Which... is actually wonderful.  But it's quite demanding.

 

If you've ever been in that situation then you know jes' what I'm talking bout, as Eddie Boyd once said, as he went back to writing his production quality code.

 

*

 

You need a plan, if you want to build a piece of software that will be incrementally functional.  You want it to be usable ASAP, so your end user can get to work as soon as possible.  But you also want it to be massively scalable, and it better be consistent.  But most interesting thing to me is how the artist mentality overcomes the direction of the product.  Suddenly, the software is a living paintbrush.  Just as the scene is getting iterated on, so is the software.  Features get and lose support as they fulfill their level of need from the end user, who is giving feedback in realtime during the development process.  Designs change and change back.  It's dizzying if you don't have the right footing, and that's why the plan is essential.

 

The other half of the battle is Shock and Awe.  Often you can get the user to go your direction on a certain feature by impressing them with what it can do.

 

 

 

Anyway I've been drinking and this entry is a stub.  To Do

posted Wednesday, August 9, 2006 2:09 AM by psantoki | 0 Comments

 
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